Wednesday, February 21, 2018
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Articles Written By AndreaGroth

Three Reasons Why Life Expectancy Has Declined in the U.S.

February 15th, 2018

As one of the richest nation’s in the world, we should have a very high life expectancy.  For the second year in a row, however, life expectancy in the U.S. has fallen.  A study released last week in the British Medical Journal details the United States’ decline from the world leader in life expectancy rates, in the 1960s, to now 1.5 years below the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) average. The National Research Council and Institute of Medicine set out to study why America’s new life expectancy, 78.7 years, falls so far below the OECD average of 80.3. The... Read More

A 21st Century Approach to Medication Adherence

February 8th, 2018

Last fall, the FDA approved a ‘digital pill’ that will tell your doctor if you’ve been taking your medicine.  The pill, which was approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration on November 13, sends a signal to a wearable sensor when a patient has taken the medication, and that information is then sent to a doctor’s office. While this may seem reminiscent of the book 1984, the technology could help many who have trouble tracking their medications. Embedded in the pill is a sensor that consists of a silicon chip with the logic circuit, along with two pieces of metal. When the sensor... Read More

This Year’s Flu Is No Joke

February 1st, 2018

The CDC is reporting an unusually severe flu season this year.  The weekly “FluView” report put out by the agency states, “all U.S. states but Hawaii continue to report widespread flu activity and the number of states experiencing ‘high’ influenza activity increased from 32 states plus New York City and Puerto Rico to 39 states plus New York City and Puerto Rico.”  In its 13 years of flu monitoring, this is the first year that the continental U.S. showed widespread flu activity. Why is the flu so bad this year?  Different strains of influenza circulate each year. This year, influenza... Read More

In A Clench? It’s Not Good For Your Teeth.

January 25th, 2018

If you ever wake up in the morning with a tight or sore jaw, fatigue, or sensitive teeth, you could be grinding or clenching your teeth at night.  The condition, known as bruxism, can lead to headaches and dental problems. Teeth grinding can be caused by stress and anxiety,  and it often occurs during sleep, caused by an abnormal bite or missing or crooked teeth. More importantly, bruxism can be caused by sleep apnea. Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when the throat muscles relax during the night, blocking the airway and interrupting breathing. About 25% of people with obstructive sleep apnea grind... Read More

Meet Someone IRL

January 23rd, 2018

The statistics speak for themselves – scientists at the Pew Research Center say 88% of singles meet their mate in real life, not online.  In fact, only 5% of couples say they met online.  This means if you are only looking for love online, your chances of meeting someone special are pretty low. We don’t live in a society that supports meeting our mates the way our parents did.  Many Americans don’t go to church or have other traditional social networks.  Working adults don’t have access to as many singles as college aged kids.  Add to that our obsession with our phones and we simply... Read More

Delayed Gratification:  The Key to Successful Weight Loss?

January 18th, 2018

The Stanford marshmallow experiment was a series of studies on delayed gratification in the late 1960s and early 1970s led by psychologist Walter Mischel, then a professor at Stanford University. In these studies, a child was offered a choice between one small reward provided immediately or two small rewards if they waited for a short period-approximately 15 minutes.  In follow-up studies, the researchers found that children who were able to wait longer for the preferred rewards tended to have better life outcomes, such as educational achievement and body mass index. While the original study was... Read More

Why Happiness Is Important to Well-being

January 11th, 2018

Topophilia is a strong emotional pull to a special place.  Research says that people experience intense feelings of well-being, contentment, and belonging from places that evoke positive memories far more than treasured objects such as photographs or wedding rings. Why is contentment important to our well-being?  Happiness is about being able to make the most of the good times – but also to cope effectively with the inevitable bad times, in order to experience the best possible overall life. Happiness actually leads to a wide range of benefits for our performance, health, relationships, and... Read More

What Is Your Big WHY?

January 4th, 2018

Every new year brings with it resolutions, goals, intentions – whatever you want to call it.  In short, we make plans for how to be better versions of ourselves.  I’d like to suggest that we think differently about the new year by considering our big WHY? Your big why is something you plug into emotionally that drives you when things get tough. It’s not a wish or a goal, it’s something that will change your life or others around you or do something for you that really matters to your soul. It’s your purpose. If you made a resolution, you may already be feeling like you should... Read More

Soup IS Good Food

December 28th, 2017

Researchers think Tom Yum Gung, a zesty Thai soup, might have cancer-fighting ingredients as well as good taste. Also called hot and sour soup, Tom Yum Gung is a shrimp soup with herbal ingredients like coriander, lemon grass, lime leaves and even galangal roots, a pungent root similar to ginger. A recent joint study by Thailand’s Kasetsart University and Japan’s Kyoto and Kinki Universities has found that the ingredients in Tom Yum Gung soup are 100 times more effective in inhibiting cancerous tumor growth than other foods. Soup has long been thought to have health enhancing properties.... Read More

What About Your Diet?

December 21st, 2017

There is no perfect diet for everyone, in spite of what you might have heard.  It seems the human body can adapt to almost any diet and survive, even thrive!  Consider the diet of the Inuit, the people indigenous to polar locations such as Siberia, Alaska, Canada, and Greenland. Theirs is a mostly meat diet, and yet they are a hardy population who consume few to no vegetables in their diet. In the US, experts recommend a diet largely focused on healthy grains, fruits and vegetables.  Most Americans don’t get the recommended 5 servings per day, and even fewer eat the 5-9 servings that is considered... Read More