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Posts Tagged With ‘ study ’

 

Cannabis and Fitness Research Goes Mainstream

May 4th, 2019

Cannabis consumers are typically portrayed as lazy, and have had the couch locked stigma association in mainstream media over the years. With new research from the University of Colorado Boulder released, the topic about cannabis and fitness is going mainstream. The stigma about cannabis consumers being lazy is being shattered by science. Men’sHealth, Maxim, The Denver Channel, Medical Marijuana, Inc., MSN and The Denver Post are just a few of many discussing the recent research. The research surveyed 600 adult cannabis consumers from states where cannabis is legal for adult use. When asked if... Read More

Cannabis Athlete Research for Holiday Cash

November 24th, 2018
cannabis research

Could you use some extra cash for the holidays? Are you active and consume cannabis? How about just active? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then you might qualify to participate in ongoing cannabis research right here in Colorado! There are several research studies being conducted throughout the state, and you can find one that fits you best. For any athletes out there who currently consume cannabis or haven’t consumed any cannabis products for the past 6 months, you could qualify for the cannabis activity study! The University of Northern Colorado Sport and Exercise Science Department... Read More

iGen More Likely Than Other Generations To Be Depressed

November 1st, 2018
two young boys playing on their phones on a curbside.

A 2015 survey found that two out of three U.S. teens owned an iPhone. For this reason, the generation of kids born after 1995 is called iGen, coined by author Jean Twenge, author of a book on the subject. According to the Pew Research Center, smart phone ownership crossed the 50 percent threshold in late 2012 – right when teen depression and suicide began to increase. These increases in depression, suicide attempts and suicide appeared among teens from every background, across all races and ethnicities, and in every region of the country. The bottom line:  iGen teens are much more likely to... Read More

Drink Some Joe To Get Out of the Red

October 25th, 2018
coffee for rosacea

Rosacea is a skin condition characterized by redness and often small, red, pus-filled bumps on the face. Over 3 million people are estimated to have rosacea and the signs and symptoms may flare up for a period of weeks to months and then diminish for a while. Rosacea can be mistaken for acne, an allergic reaction or other skin problems. The cause of rosacea is unknown, but it could be due to a combination of hereditary and environmental factors. A number of factors can trigger rosacea by increasing blood flow to the surface of your skin. Some of these factors include: Hot drinks Spicy foods Alcohol Temperature... Read More

The Science of Hugging for Health

October 11th, 2018
The children hugging outside.

From birth to death, one of the most important parts of being human is the need for physical contact. Did you know that a firm hug can make you feel less negative emotion? Scientists found that getting a hug on the day of a conflict was linked to a slight rise in positive emotions and a comparable drop in negative ones, and appeared to linger into the following day. Evidence suggests that close physical contact — such as a hug — can play a part in reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases, blood pressure, stress, loneliness, aggression, anxiety and depression. When you hug someone, you release... Read More

A New Vaccine for Cancer Is On The Horizon

October 4th, 2018
syringe with a blue substance in it with other bottles of red and yellow behind it.

In 2018, an estimated 1.7 million new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in the United States and over 600 thousand people will die from the disease. Recently, a phase I trial was conducted testing a personalized vaccine’s ability to hold an aggressive group of cancers in check. The trial is the first step to determining if a vaccine can stop cancer in its tracks. The promising new cancer vaccine cured up to 97 percent of tumors in mice and will soon be tested in humans for the first time. Researchers from Stanford University will test the therapy in about 35 people with lymphoma by the end of... Read More

Living Diagnosis for Brain Injury on the Horizon

July 19th, 2018
CTE

Brain injury has been a hot topic of conversation since Dr. Bennet Omalu, a forensic pathologist, conducted the autopsy of Pittsburgh Steelers center Mike Webster in 2002. The autopsy led to his discovery of a new disease that he named chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. CTE is the term used to describe brain degeneration likely caused by repeated head traumas. Symptoms of CTE include difficulty thinking, impulsive behavior, depression, short-term memory loss, emotional instability, substance abuse and suicidal thoughts or behavior. At present, diagnosing CTE can only be done after death.... Read More

Cardiovascular Fitness May Be A Piece of the Puzzle for Reducing Risk for Dementia

March 29th, 2018

There’s a very strong connection between cardiovascular health—the health of your heart and circulatory system—and the health of your brain, so it makes sense that a longitudinal study of women indicated that those with the highest levels of cardiovascular fitness had an 88% lower risk for dementia. About 5.4 million people in the United States are estimated to be living with Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. The Swedish study involved 191 women in Sweden, 38 to 60 years old, who completed an evaluation of their cardiovascular fitness. The women’s workload... Read More

Low Fat vs. Low Carb – Which Diet Works?

March 8th, 2018

It’s almost spring and many Americans start to think about dumping the winter plump in preparation for summer.  With that in mind, consider some recent information comparing dieting techniques and their success at helping you lose a few. Some dieters firmly believe in avoiding fat and while others espouse avoiding carbs. Does it matter? In a recent study at Stanford University researchers put more than 600 overweight adults on either a healthy low-fat or low-carb diet. It turns out, participants had similar levels of weight loss success on each plan. That’s right!  Both diets were successful. The... Read More